Rudi’s Section

ROASTED CARROT & CONFIT ONION SALAD

Roasted Carrot w Confit Onions

ROASTED CARROT & CONFIT ONION SALAD

I have a thing for roasted carrots & roasted onion, I do not think I am the only one with this problem. When we cook it as an accompaniment to a roast it is the best. When left for the next day, if you are lucky enough, it is equally as delicious. But it did need an extra element to cut through the olive oil, first we made the dressing with yoghurt, which worked very well.
Then we decided to try using another favourite, hummus, and thinning it out a little. This opened a whole lot of other possibilities, adding mint, zest, sesame, pine nuts, cashew and parsley.

500g Baby Carrots
300g Confit Baby Onions
1 Tsp Cumin Seeds
3 Bay Leaves
4 Garlic Cloves
Sprig Thyme
1 TSP Black Pepper Corns
1 Cup Olive Oil + 15 ml for Carrots
2 Tbsp Honey
Salt
Pepper

Dressing
100g Hummus
2 Tsp Toasted Sesame Seeds
2 Tbsp Water
2 Tbsp Olive Oil form confit
2 Tbsp Lemon juice
1 Tbsp Chopped Parsley
10 ml Lemon Juice
Method
Combine Carrots with olive oil, honey, salt & pepper
Roast for 10-15 Minutes at 160°C

For the onions
Place Baby Onions in small saucepan covering with olive oil, add pepper corns, Olive oil, Bay leaves, salt, thyme and garlic. Close with foil.

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Wasted 4 – Fashionably Rejected

SWISS CHARD

Further to the last conversation around the wasted skin and flesh, is it really waste that we are talking about? It is destined for the bin due to laziness, lack of interest, poor skills or cheap food and because it is destined for the bin, it is waste or perhaps we could call it the unwanted, shunned or fashionably rejected. It is still disrespectful and this introspect is needed.

Currently we are busy working on a number of projects and re writing a bunch of recipes. One idea we discussed is that we should not cut up anything new for creating an atchar or jam, but instead use the items left to waste. So some of these projects include kimchi with shaved cauliflower stalks, cauliflower atchar made with stalks, lime atchar, orange skin preserve, melon skin preserve, celery salt, tomato salt and marmalade made with all the oranges left over from juicing. The more we dig the more we find, the more we find the more guilt we are surrounded with, as we have forgotten how to really respect ingredients.

One of our success stories has been the complete utilisation of Swiss chard and writing the recipe around the use. It took a long time, four years probably before all the staff bought into the system that we use all. The only way was to write the recipe specific. But we had to be smart and include other bits, like the outer leaves from the baby gem leaves. Over the months we tweaked the recipe adding a little onion, chili, carrot and feta. Eventually we made the whole thing gluten free with the no crust adding some quinoa.

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Roasted Carrot and Mango Salad with a Sesame Dressing

Carrot and Mango B

100g Red Cabbage
50g Shaved Carrots
50g Sugar Snap Peas blanched and sliced
200g Baby carrots roasted with sesame oil
1 Mango peeled, sliced or cubed
30g kale shredded
50g Corn
1 Tbsp sesame seeds

Garlic, Ginger Sesame Dressing
50ml Vinegar Rice Wine
50ml Soya
3 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 Tbsp Brown Sugar
1 Tbsp grated ginger (microplane)
1 Tsp sesame oil
3 Spring Onion sliced thinly

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WASTED 3, FROM THE BONE, TROUT TARTARE

TROUT TARTARE

We have a tendency to discard skin and bones very quickly after filleting, but there is a fair amount of flesh that remain after filleting. The easiest is the use a spoon and scrape off the excess. Then we have done two items one was a croquette with quinoa and some lemon zest and the other was a tartare. With these two examples we have opened a whole lot of other possibilitie

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Pork Ribs With a Coffee Basting Sauce

Ribs

Coffee Pork Ribs Photo credit – www.crushmag-online.com

Jaco created this recipe for on of our shoots with crush online, must say it is perfect for those lazy Sunday afternoon braai’s or even for a new years day braai. A lot of marinated ribs are available off the shelf ready for the braai. But there is nothing more satisfying than cooking own ribs flavouring a vegetable stock with ginger, cloves and star anise. Then basting the ribs for the braai with this coffee inspired sauce.

Yield: 2kg pork ribs, 4 portions

INGREDIENTS
for the pork ribs
2kg pork ribs, cut into 500g portions (par-cooked)

For the coffee basting sauce
70ml double espresso
70ml bbq sauce
70ml sweet Indonesian soya sauce
2g sambal oelek
5g fresh ginger, grated fine
5g corn flour

METHOD
Place the ribs on the braai and first warm them before starting to brush them with the basting sauce
Brush the rib every time you turn them and only leave them for about a minute or two on each side, to avoid caramelising the meat too much
Cut the ribs into small riblets and serve warm

To prepare the coffee basting sauce
Combine the coffee, sweet Indonesian soya sauce, ginger, bbq sauce and mix well
Take some of the coffee sauce and add it to the corn flour and mix into a slurry
Ad the slurry back to the coffee sauce and pour the mix into a small sauce pot
Warm the sauce until it starts to thicken – check the flavouring
Remove from the heat and cool
Use a brush to baste the ribs while they on the braai

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Roasted Butternut and Roasted red Peppers

Butternut salad with roasted peppers

500g Honey Roasted Butternut
200g Roasted Red Peppers(deseeded and skinned)
50g Toasted Pumpkin Seeds

Dressing
30g Honey
1 Tbsp Mustard Dijon
40ml Vinegar white wine
90 ml Oil Canola

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WASTED 2, TROUT BELLY, SMOKED

Hot Smoked Trout

Trout Belly

Whenever we clean trout the normal rule is an approximate waste of 50%. Considering the cost is one thing, my problem is the amount that is left, the amount that is flogged most of the time to the bin. We want perfect pieces of fish with no bones with no belly.
The belly is the best part, fatty and with so much taste. So as part of this little discovery on our journey we decided to hot smoke the belly. From there we have endless possibilities from salad, pate, rillette, terrine and kedgeree.
For this part of wasted we have cured the belly with sugar and salt in equal quantities for two hours. Then hot smoked the bellies for 20 minutes. We have also put away some of the smoked belly to access what it does after being frozen.
For the salad we pulled the belly pieces in large chunks added some red onion, samphire, carrot tops and lettuce.

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Potato Lentil Salad

DSC_0176

In this weeks salad from Oasis, Kim has made a great potato salad with a slight twist, combining potato and lentils in a light mustard dressing and Italian parsley. If this is not you choice of dressing change it up with a yoghurt dressing or a mayonnaise based one.

800g New Potatoes Boiled and halved
150g Cooked lentils
½ Red onion sliced
1 Cup picked parsley

Dressing
30g Grainy Dijon Mustard
40ml Vinegar white wine
2tbsp Honey
90 ml Oil Canola
20 ml Oil Grape seed
1 tbsp Chives sliced fine
Salt and pepper
20 ml lemon juice fresh squeezed

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To Waste or not to Waste!

IMG_6364

Cauliflower and Broccoli Stalks

As a kitchen we have moved away from hiding the unwanted and keeping all waste above table. This has not always gone down as a popular decision. Chefs are damn stubborn when it comes to change.
We are only focusing on one specific part of waste, the unwanted!
Perhaps calling unwanted parts as waste is incorrect as it still has a negative connotation associated with the part, the part needs to gain popularity in order to move up the chain and be wanted.
Recipes generally are created keeping in mind all the prime, good and sexy parts. Celery leaves are left garnishing the bin, green parts of leeks frowned at and the stalks from cauliflower and broccoli destined for either the bin or badly made soup. What we starting doing in our kitchen is writing recipes with waste in mind. Recipe books are to blame for poor cooking decisions like cross seasonal ingredients being used or no reference anywhere in what must happen with stalks and those unwanted pieces.
Food has become cheap, as it is too easy to bin something, instead of maximising each ingredient and using it to its full potential. We continuously consume without really looking at what we are consuming, wanting more and more and more. It is all just so convenient and so easy. If we felt it in our pocket we might think twice. We are so far removed from what reality is. We have no respect for ingredients, we have no respect for farmers who have taken months in growing beautiful vegetables just for us to show contempt for vegetables.
Part of this journey of ours is rediscovering ways of not wasting, maximising products in ways that guest can appreciate and staff can respect processes. We have started encouraging the lesser to be used before the popular in order to stimulate the use.
There has been numerous online publications, books as well as movies that have been written & created in order to expose and highlight the problem we face in kitchens all over from our modest homes to professional outfits with egos and attitudes.
There are off course limitations in that in some cases certain items cannot be used and for these we have a worm farm. Our objective is not to feed the worms, but instead use everything first and then feed the worms.
A good example is the quiche recipe used on our afternoon tea. It has specifically been formulated to use stalks from Swiss-chard as well a baby gem lettuce as part of the mix. This allows us to be responsible in our choices. In no part has the end product suffered.
This is a journey of discovery and learning how to cook!

Every Week a new picture will be published looking at our new favourite parts.

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Roast Turkey With Bacon and Apple Stuffing

Turkey

Photo Credit www.crushmag-online.com

Bacon and Apple Stuffing
20 ml olive oil
3 medium onions, peeled and diced
2 celery stalks, diced
130 g bacon, chopped
100 g butter
15 g sugar
3 Granny Smith apples, peeled and cubed (small)
100 g pecan nuts, roughly chopped
6 cloves garlic, peeled
½ C (125 ml) apple cider
½ C (125 ml) chicken stock
30 ml sage, chopped
30 ml parsley, chopped
30 ml fresh thyme, picked
1 tsp (5 ml) lemon zest
50 g liver, minced
500 g stale bread (ciabatta), dried
salt and pepper, to taste
3 eggs (optional)

Roast Turkey
5-6 kg turkey, whole
salt and pepper
200 g carrots, cubed
200 g apples, cubed
200 g onions, cubed
200 g celery, cubed
2 oranges, halved
2 sprigs thyme
2 bay leaves
50 g butter
500 ml chicken stock
2 heads garlic, whole, cut in half crossways
16 baby onions, skinned
12 small to medium sized whole carrots, peeled

Gravy
reserved juices (from roast)
100-150 ml white wine, sherry or cider
extra stock, as needed
beurre manie, as required
reserved turkey liver, cleaned and chopped (optional)

Roast potatoes
12 -16 whole potatoes, peeled
salt and pepper
pinch paprika
rosemary or thyme, picked
100 g duck fat (use more if needed)

Bacon and Apple Stuffing
Heat the olive oil in a pan over medium heat. Sauté the onions until soft. Add the celery and bacon and continue to cook until the celery is soft. Add the butter, sugar and apples and continue to sauté allowing the mixture to caramelise slightly. Add the pecan nuts and garlic.

Add the cider to deglaze then add the stock and reduce by half.

Add the herbs, lemon zest and minced liver.

Add the bread and allow the liquid to be absorbed, continue mixing until soft. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Allow to cool.

The stuffing can be made the day before. I do not add egg to my stuffing but if a tighter stuffing is preferred, add three whole eggs when finishing off the stuffing.

Roast Turkey
As this is a big bird it will benefit from being covered for the first half of the cooking time in the oven. For a turkey between 5-6 kg allow 3-3¾ hours in the oven. Covering the bird with foil for the first 1-1 ½ hours, will avoid the skin burning. Take care not to wrap the foil too tightly around the skin as the foil will stick to the skin.
Remove giblets and neck, use with mire poix vegetables when roasting. Keep the liver for use later.
Preheat the oven to 180 °C.
Season the bird inside and outside with the salt and pepper.
Fill the cavity with the stuffing and truss the turkey. Rub the outside of the turkey with butter and place on a bed of the cut vegetables in a roasting pan. Add the giblets and necks. Add the oranges, thyme and bay leaves. Pour the stock into roasting pan and cover with foil (shiny side down).Remove the foil after 1 hour to check the turkey and rub with butter again.

Add the whole carrots, the baby onions and the whole garlic heads (cut across in half). Continue cooking and basting for the remaining time. Take care not to burn the turkey. If it gets too dark, place foil over it again to finish.
If using a thermometer to check the internal temperature, remove the turkey from the oven when it reaches 70 °C and allow to rest (temperature will rise to 78 °C after resting).
Remove carrots, onion and garlic.
Remove the turkey from the roasting pan while resting to make sure that you catch all of the juices. Rest covered.
Gravy
As I do not have an exact recipe for the gravy, instinct must guide you. Retain all of the juices and drippings to make a great gravy. Deglaze the roasting pan with cider and place the liquid into a small saucepan over medium heat, making sure that all the pieces of the mirepoix, the neck and gizzards are added. Add more stock if needed and continue to reduce until the flavour is perfect. Add a small amount of beurre manié to thicken.
Strain and add chopped liver for the final sauce (optional).
Roast potatoes
Cut the potatoes in half or quarters and place into cold salted water. Bring to the boil for about a minute and half, remove and place in a colander. This is important as the potatoes must get moved around to ruffle the edges and surfaces as this creates delicious crispy bits.
Place in a roasting pan, season with salt, pepper and paprika and sprinkle with picked rosemary or thyme. Roast in duck fat for about 40- 60 minutes depending on the size. Turn potatoes regularly to ensure even browning.

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